Click Free Bone Safe Seminar for Details on a Free workshop about Bone Safe Movement at the Mountain View Library that I’m presenting on

Wednesday November 13 at 7pm at the

Mountain View Public Library.

Free Movement Do’s and Don’ts handbooks available for attendees.

IMG_3767Free Bone Safe Seminar

Sponsored by American Bone Health

 

Starting Sept 23, Teresa is offering some exciting new classes at Stanford University.

You do not need to be affiliated with Stanford in order to attend these classes. They are open to all.

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Heart of Pilates

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Have you caught yourself slumping in your reflection?
Are you wanting to increase your strength, flexibility and balance so you can do the things you want to do with ease?
This class includes standing, sitting and matwork Pilates exercises to improve your posture, balance, strength and overall wellness.
Taught by Teresa Maldonado Marchok, a licensed PT, certified Pilates instructor and former professional dancer, she’s created a program that is grounded in science yet fun.
Acquire the skills to make immediate postural changes and be prepared to laugh (great for the core).
Expect beneficial crossover to sports like skiing, tennis, and golf.
Please bring a mat.

Session 1:  Sept 23 – Dec 13, 2013 – no class Thanksgiving week
Day:                  Mondays
Time:                5:15 – 6:10 pm
Location:        Stanford University Roble 57
Fee:                 $100

To Register online:

1. Go to https://healthimprovement.stanford.edu/classes/register/hipClasses.php

2. Click on the “Pilates Mat/Healthy Back” button on the left hand sidebar list.

3. Find the “Heart of Pilates” entry – third one from the top.

4. Click on the “Register” button to go through a secure on-line registration and payment process.

 

To Register by Mail:

1. Go to http://hip.stanford.edu/documents/FitnessSchedule.pdf

2. Find the description and class code for the “Heart of Pilates” classes on page 8.

3. Print out the last page (pg 16) of the document, fill out the form and mail it to the enclosed address.

4. Make checks payable to “Stanford University”.

You can register for both the “Heart of Pilates” and “Pilates for Bone Health” classes that Teresa is offering at the same time.

Pilates for Bone Building

Pilates with Teresa Side Bend Ball Exercise

Are you worried about losing your balance, falling, breaking a bone?
Have you been diagnosed with low bone density?
There are simple things you can do, right now, which will dramatically reduce your risk of falling or injuring yourself.
In this class we’ll incorporate standing, sitting and mat Pilates exercises that will strengthen your body including your bones.
You’ll be guided through stretches, balance exercises, energizing weight-bearing routines and basic alignment precautions that will help you move through your daily activities safely.
Rather than decline with age you will improve!
Props are incorporated into the class to provide resistance and assistance.
Please bring a mat.

Fall Dates:     Sept 23 – Dec 13, 2013 – no class Thanksgiving week
Day:                 Mondays
Time:               6:15 – 7:10 pm
Location:       Stanford University Roble 57
Fees:                $100

 

To Register online:

1. Go to https://healthimprovement.stanford.edu/classes/register/hipClasses.php

2. Click on the “Pilates Mat/Healthy Back” button on the left hand sidebar list.

3. Find the “Pilates for Bone Building” entry – number twelve from the top, fifth one from the bottom.

4. Click on the “Register” button to go through a secure on-line registration and payment process.

 

To Register by Mail:

1. Go to http://hip.stanford.edu/documents/FitnessSchedule.pdf

2. Find the description and class code for the “Pilates for Bone Building” classes on page 8.

3. Print out the last page (pg 16) of the document, fill out the form and mail it to the enclosed address.

4. Make checks payable to “Stanford University”.

Less is More breast stroke prep lifted

In Pilates you’ll often gain optimal results from an exercise when you make your movements smaller rather than larger.

 

As with most things in life, “less is more.” In a world were Costco supplies us with 45 rolls of toilet paper at a time, we drink from coffee cups large enough to fill our gas tanks and eat muffins capable of feeding a family of four.

Bigger is not always better.

It is common practice to go to extreme ranges of motion during an exercise because it makes us “feel” like we are working harder, but are we really?

The opposite is most likely true. Next time you have a moment like this ask yourself, “What am I really feeling?”

Understanding where a movement comes
 from is the essence of the work of Pilates. At times it can be even more important than the actual movement itself. Exercises where there is very little or even no movement incurred can literally produce a brow-full of sweat and a mountain of shaking muscles which is so much more effective than moving in an exaggerated way, just for the sake of creating motion.

In the version of the swan seen in the photos here, the model (thank you Rose) demonstrates excellent form in raising up just to the point of correct recruitment and alignment. She avoids hyperextending her back and neck and maintains excellent core stability with her head well placed on her spine. This benefits our spines greatly and helps counteract the forward bending forces of gravity and a desk/car/seated lifestyle.

Sometimes the names of Pilates exercises can be somewhat misleading and/or deceptive in that the mind shifts the focus to the particular body part such as–leg circles, arm circles–just to name a few. The objective of these particular exercises is not to create the biggest circle possible, but instead to be exceptionally steady and solid in the trunk and core despite the circular action of the limbs.

Less in more breast stroke prep lifted 2

 

Try shifting your focus. Instead of wondering if your movement is big enough, evaluate to see if you’re making a connection to your core and your breath during the exercise.

 

And if you’re not, the question should then be why and what can you do to make that connection? 

One strategy may be to limit your range of motion.

Frequently moving your extremities beyond a certain point actually makes it harder to stabilize your core. For example, when your arms move behind your shoulders during an arm circle, the muscles required to stabilize your shoulder girdle and trunk are simply not accessible. Even worse, other less proficient muscles for that movement (like the “traps”)are very likely to take over. You may not be feeling any core muscles because they simply can’t engage due to the position you are in. So don’t be afraid to be conservative and employ restraint. It is absolutely okay if you aren’t moving as high, wide or far as the person next to you.

It can be difficult to employ this technique, especially if you have a tendency to hyper-extend your joints (knees, elbows, etc.) as many of us do. However, just because you can move your body to an extreme position, doesn’t necessarily mean that you should.

As with any habit it takes mindful practice to create new muscle memory. Be patient. Give yourself time to work in this different way and work with a teacher you trust to give you insights. Changes such as these won’t happen overnight. Remember you are the product of years of moving the way you do. When you bring awareness to change, you will dramatically transform your posture and the way you move.

So remember, the next time you’re in the studio taking a lesson or class, tell yourself that less can truly be More!

PMA banner

Teresa will have available, her newly released BoneSmart Pilates® DVD at the Pilates Method Alliance annual meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. October 9-12 2013

DVD Cover w-bigger type Amazon.001

 

You can find her at Booth #1, Dyenamic Movement Products Inc, where  Kimberly Dye, creator of the Stretch-eze ®  will graciously be sharing space with Teresa.

If you are planning to attend the PMA conference, be sure to stop in and introduce yourself to Teresa. She’d be happy to answer any questions you might have about the DVD or about her upcoming Pilates Instructor Training, BoneSmart Pilates® for Osteoporosis Workshop on November 9 & 10, 2013 at BASI headquarters in Costa Mesa, CA

Marguerite Ogle’s 5 star review at About.com,  states  “If you ever thought the combination of osteoporosis and exercise meant severely limited workouts, the BoneSmart Pilates® DVD from Teresa Maldonado Marchok will change your mind. This DVD is full of osteoporosis-safe exercises put together in workouts that are both interesting and balanced.”… Read More

A BoneSmart Pilates® DVD review by Pilates Style Magazine will be in their upcoming November/December 2013 Issue.

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For more information about the Pilates Method Alliance,

click here.

Teresa is offering some exciting new classes in Los Altos.

Check them out below and then call  (650) 947-2518 or email sgualtieri@losaltoshills.ca.gov to register. If the class has already started, ask the registration desk about prorating your classes.

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Heart of Pilates

Have you caught yourself slumping in your reflection?Heart of Pilates sidebarAre you wanting to increase your strength, flexibility and balance so you can do the things you want to do with ease?
This class includes standing, sitting and matwork Pilates exercises to improve your posture, balance, strength and overall wellness.
Taught by Teresa Maldonado Marchok, a licensed PT, certified Pilates instructor and former professional dancer, she’s created a program that is grounded in science yet fun.
Acquire the skills to make immediate postural changes and be prepared to laugh (great for the core).
Expect beneficial crossover to sports like skiing, tennis, and golf.
Please bring a mat, miniball and resistance band.
9″ miniballs and resistance bands are available for $10 each from the instructor.

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Session 1: 9/10 – 11/19 no class 10/8
Day:                  Tuesdays
Time:                8:30 – 9:30 am
Location:        Town Hall Council Chambers
Fees:                 $190 Residents/$204 Non-Residents

Session 2: 1/7 – 2/25 no class 2/18
Day:                   Tuesdays
Time:                 8:30 – 9:30 am
Location:          Town Hall Council Chambers
Fees:                   $133 Residents/$147 Non-Residents.

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BoneSmart Pilates® and Beyond

Are you worried about losing your balance, falling, breaking a bone?bonesmart sidebarHave you been diagnosed with low bone density?
There are simple things you can do, right now, which will dramatically reduce your risk of falling or injuring yourself.
In this class we’ll incorporate standing, sitting and mat Pilates exercises that will strengthen your body including your bones.
You’ll be guided through stretches, balance exercises, energizing weight-bearing routines and basic alignment precautions that will help you move through your daily activities safely.
Rather than decline with age you will improve!
Props are incorporated into the class to provide resistance and assistance.
Please bring a mat.
9″ minballs and resistance bands are available from the instructor, $20 for both.

Fall Dates:      9/18 – 11/13 no class 10/9 and 11/6  
Day:                  Wednesdays
Time:                12:30 – 1:30 pm
Location:        Town Hall Council Chambers
Fees:                 $128 Residents/$147 Non-Residents
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Winter Dates: 1/29 – 3/26 no class 2/19
Day:                   Wednesdays
Time:                 12:30 – 1:30 pm
Location:          Town Hall Council Chambers
Fees:                   $128 Residents/$142 Non-Residents.

 

All classes are held at the Los Altos Hills Recreation Center

See Los Altos Hills Activity Guide for dates/times and registration information. You can also call: (650) 947-2518 or email sgualtieri@losaltoshills.ca.gov for more information.

I want to let you know about my newly released DVD BoneSmart Pilates®, which is a culmination of my combined 30+ years of experience as a licensed PT, former professional dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company and certified Pilates instructor.  This DVD features safe Pilates inspired exercise techniques for those with low bone density including osteoporosis and osteopenia and is based on my research and the seminars I present at Stanford University through the School of Medicines’ Health Improvement Program. It is also influenced by my affiliation as a representative and speaker for “American Bone Health”.  You can view a trailer at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uwnoQSBbuQ&feature=youtu.be

This DVD is great for those of you who want to improve your strength, balance, flexibility and bone density in a fun and clinically proven safe way.
This DVD is also beneficial for Pilates instructors who want some guidance and tools for working with clients that have low bone density.

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***I am confident that my DVD is unique in many ways.  Here’s a few examples.

…I include demonstrators from 5 distinct decades 40’s to 80’s, real people with real issues.

…Props are included to increase challenge as well as to make certain exercises safer.

…My experience as a Martha Graham Dance Company soloist and physical therapist has influenced the     content and specifically inspired me to create the “Bone Dance”, a movement sequence grounded in           science, that is effective and fun.

…It includes over 2hrs of informative content and workouts with an easy to navigate menu.

***ORDER NOW FOR FREE SHIPPING (expires midnight PST, Thursday August 8, 2013)

Weight-of-world-on-shoulders

The Weight of the World is resting on your shoulders.
Or at least that’s what it often feels like, doesn’t it?  Who hasn’t experienced tight, cramped, knotted muscles in the neck and shoulders after a long, stressful day.  Muscle strain in this area of the body can contribute to rounded shoulders, poor posture and even tension headaches. Overly active shoulder muscles reflect the tension and anxiety we carry with us throughout the course of the day.

Unfortunately, relieving this strain is not as easy as simply telling yourself to relax your shoulders. Because more than likely, five minutes later, your shoulders are back up in your ears. If you don’t engage the appropriate muscles to properly stabilize the shoulder blades, keeping them in place, it won’t matter how much you try to relax your muscles.


scapulae positioning
Most people don’t realize that the shoulder blades, technically known as scapulae, are flat triangular bones on the back that are capable of quite a bit of movement. They can go up and down, towards and away from the spine, and even turn slightly. The ideal position of the shoulder blades is a slight, constant downwards (towards the hips) directional pull. Muscles in the back and trunk (lats, mid to lower trapezius, serratus anterior) are responsible for this depression of the shoulder blades, rather than the muscles in the neck or shoulders themselves. When you’re stressed and moving without awareness, the shoulders ride up and these muscles ultimately become strained and overworked as they were not designed to be used this way and are highly inefficient at this task.
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So What Can You Do About This?

scapulae demo
One of the best ways to understand this concept is to think of stabilization of the shoulder blades like the workings of a pulley system. Just like when you do Ribcage Arms in Pilates, if you were to raise your arm straight up towards your head, the shoulder blades must draw downwards.
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Just like a pulley, the higher you lift your arm, the more depression you need in the shoulder blades. Additionally, after a certain degree of lift of the arm, the shoulder blades not only pull downwards but turn, like fans rotating in opposite directions. All of this occurs to create adequate space for the upper arm bone (the humerus)  enabling the back and trunk to get stronger and encourage the muscles in the neck and shoulders to relax.

globe as face


Essentially, the more mindful you are–the more relaxed you’ll be. The next time you’re feeling tense and overwhelmed, focus on engaging the muscles in your back and trunk as well as softening your shoulders. Just because you carry the world on your back, doesn’t mean that you have to look like you do.

Teresa

Do you rock when you roll (like a ball)? Is plank a pleasure? Does your back extension go swimmingly? What is it for you? We all have certain exercises that illicit a sense of joy when performed during class. However it should be considered that often the exercises that we don’t like or don’t do well are the ones that our bodies actually need to do more. There is a reason why we tend to gravitate towards the exercises that we like. Read more

When one of my clients told me her sister fractured her back doing rollover during a Pilates class, I was disturbed. Though the instructor knew there was a diagnosis of osteoporosis, she was not aware of the movement contraindications for her client. This woman experienced a vertebral fracture that was totally preventable.

The statistics are out there, and they’re scary. 70% of people with osteoporosis or osteopenia are undiagnosed. They don’t even know they have it and many of them are probably in your classes. We, as Pilates instructors, need to be fully informed, not only about what is contraindicated, but what we can proactively do to help this growing population stay healthy, strong and fracture-free.  Read more

JEAN PIERRET

Jean reminds me in many ways of Joseph Pilates, who had a devilish spirit and an amazingly fit body well into his 80’s. Not one to be restricted by societal pressures he longs to “be free and to do what I want to do”.  One of his long time passions includes woodworking and handcrafting classical Spanish guitars.

Read more