Tag Archive for: Osteoporosis

For many of us, getting older isn’t easy. We persevere through stiffness, aches, and pains.

The good news is we don’t have to accept these “inconveniences” of age as inevitable.

The key, my friends, is lean muscle mass.  According to Dr. Allen Mishra, an orthopedic surgeon at Stanford, “muscles are modifiable until the day you die.” And there’s recent research to back this up.

Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Vonda Wright notes that “we do not have to be the victims of the passage of time; we don’t have to go down a slippery slope from vitality to frailty and do nothing about it.”  She states that the number one thing that can save our lives is our lean muscle mass.

Muscles play a crucial role in aging and longevity due to their impact on overall health, mobility, and metabolic function. Here are several reasons why muscle matters for aging and longevity:

 

  • Metabolism and Weight Management: Muscle tissue is more metabolically active than fat tissue, which burns more calories even at rest. As people age, they tend to lose muscle mass, which can decrease basal metabolic rate. This makes it easier to gain weight and harder to maintain a healthy weight, which in turn can increase the risk of various health conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Preserving muscle mass through exercise and a balanced diet can help mitigate these risks.

 

  • Bone Health is a subject I’m passionate about: Muscles are connected to bones through tendons, and when muscles contract, they exert force on bones, which in turn helps to stimulate bone growth. This is crucial, especially for women who are at a higher risk of osteoporosis, a condition where bones become weak and brittle. According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), one in two women over 50 will experience an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime. Engaging in weight-bearing exercises and resistance training can improve bone density and reduce the risk of fractures as people age. And don’t forget impact exercises to “surprise the bones,” which, according to Wolf’s law, stimulates bone growth. If you do have osteopenia or osteoporosis, make sure to find a trainer or physical therapist who has special certification for working with osteoporosis. There are clear guidelines that need to be followed to keep you safe.

 

  • Leg Power Predicts Brain PowerAccording to a UK study by Steves et al 2015, evidence showed that the stronger the legs were, the less risk of dementia and the greater the gray matter in the brain. For those concerned about cognitive decline, this is an actionable step you can take. Strengthen those legs.

 

  • Balance and Fall Prevention: Strong muscles, particularly those in the legs and core, are essential for balance and stability. Falls are a significant concern for older adults, as they can lead to serious injuries such as hip fractures. Having good muscle strength and
    balance reduces the risk of falls and enhances the ability to recover from a loss of balance. Also, don’t forget that having strong arm and shoulder muscles and a strong core can help you avoid a fracture by “catching yourself” before your hips or knees hit the ground.

 

  • Functional Independence: Maintaining muscle mass and strength is directly linked to the ability to perform daily tasks
    independently. This includes activities such as walking, climbing stairs, carrying groceries, and getting up from a chair. As people age, the loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) can impair these functional abilities, leading to a loss of independence. Regular strength training and exercise can help preserve muscle function and independence.

 

  • Hormone Regulation: We often perceive muscle as something that helps keep us strong or helps us move.  What we might not realize is that muscle also serves as an endocrine-like organ. When muscles contract, they release these molecules called myokines.  Myokines have positive effects on your Metabolic system, Cardiovascular system, Immune system and your Mental function.  Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protects your brain and supports neuroplasticity essential for learning and memory. A 2023 study by Abou Sawan et al showed evidence that “increasing physical activity can affect cognitive function in older adults.”

 

  • Inflammatory Response: Chronic low-grade inflammation is a common feature of aging and is associated with various age-related diseases, including heart disease and Alzheimer’s. Regular exercise, especially resistance training, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects, which can contribute to better overall health and longevity.

 

  • Longevity and Quality of Life (QOL): Overall, maintaining muscle mass and strength is associated with a longer, healthier life. Studies have consistently shown that individuals with higher muscle mass tend to live longer and have a lower risk of age-related diseases. Additionally, having good muscle health improves the quality of life in older adults, allowing them to remain active, independent, and engaged in daily activities. If you don’t have the strength to take a walk, get into and out of your chair safely, or play with your grandkids, your quality of life plummets.

 

One of the key findings from the Okinawa Japan Blue Zone is that their environment naturally encouraged strengthening. For instance, a typical home has low-lying tables, and people sit on the floor. Centenarians rise up and down from the floor on average 30 times a day and, in the process, strengthen their hips, legs, and core and hone their balance. That’s a lot of squats and a lot of function!  Okinawan centenarians tend to their gardens most days. They weed, pull, dig, and squat for one to two hours a day. In contrast, falls are one of the top ten leading causes of death for older people in the US. They have weak hips and legs and poor balance because so many of them are sedentary, sitting in chairs and Lay Z Boys.

 

A few Commonsense Thoughts

We are not destined to go from vitality to frailty

Remember, your muscles are modifiable till the day you die.  Commit to continuous improvement to create the best version of yourself every day!  As Dr. Mishra suggests,  “Exercise relentlessly.”  Do resistance training daily.  He proposes you consider resistance training as necessary as brushing your teeth daily.

You don’t have to join a power-lifting club to maintain your muscle.  Just begin today to do some form of resistance training if you’re able. Work with a physical therapist or trainer to help you develop a customized strength training program regardless of your age. Dr. Mishra notes that the higher the weight, the more susceptible you might be to injury, like tearing a tendon. Instead, it’s more important to be consistent.

Here are some simple strength exercises you could begin today.

  • 💪 Biceps curls with hand weights that challenge you without strain. Emphasize slowing down the unfolding (eccentric phase) of the exercise. 8-10 reps

 

 

  • Triceps kickbacks with hand weights, emphasize slowing down the bending portion of the exercise. 8-10 reps

 

 

  • Resistance bands. 8-10 reps

 

 

  • Planks (start with hands and knees-lifting the knees just off the ground, spine straight) Hold 10-15 sec.

 

 

  • Chair Squats (sit-to-stand) Emphasize slowing the descent to the chair to build more control and strength. Start with five reps twice a day and build from there.

 

Muscles are not just about strength and appearance; they are vital for overall health, mobility, and longevity. To get optimal results, be consistent and take responsibility for showing up for yourself, even if you’re working with a trainer or PT.

One tip Dr. Mishra provided was this: even 8 minutes a day of strength training makes a difference!

If you’re short on time, the BoneSmart Burst™ subscription might be the answer. These 5 to 10-minute bone-safe workouts, designed by a physical therapist, are a great way to start your day or break up a day of too much sitting.  Participants say these bone-safe exercise bursts are “bite-sized enough to be doable with a busy schedule” and “the variety is great!”

In conclusion, to promote healthy aging and improve longevity, take agency for your own progress and modify your muscles with consistency and conviction.

 

Exercise can feel like drudgery when you frame it as something you “have to do” rather than something you “get to do.”

As a movement educator and motivator, I’m always searching for ways to infuse joy into the classes I teach. Why? Because it makes it fun. If movement isn’t fun, why do it?  It should feel good and help change your outlook in some way.

The way I teach is informed by science and research. I’m particularly influenced by the research findings of Kelly McGonigal, a health psychologist and author of “The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection, and Courage.”

Across cultures and ages, there are specific movements that both express and elicit joy. Think about hitting a goal, winning a race, or accomplishing something important to you. The universal physical sign for joy is arms thrown overhead in the air. This is seen with young and old, internationally, and even with blind people who’ve never visually seen that movement. It’s a universal physical manifestation of an emotion.

 

 

 

If we listen to music in a group, we might notice people swaying their arms overhead, often in unison, expressing joy and connection.

The feelings you derive from a class can have lasting positive effects. For instance, if you felt strong and capable during certain exercises when you encounter a challenge later in the day, you are already armed with the sense that you are strong enough to handle it. You’ve altered your outlook even outside of class. That’s a powerful way to use movement to foster a positive mental state.

 

Celebrate what you CAN Do!

Sometimes we become so focused on our limitations that we forget to celebrate what we CAN do! Maybe it’s just moving to your favorite music in a way that makes you smile. That’s an absolutely legitimate form of exercise, and you should incorporate whatever kind of movement brings you joy. Movement in any form should be viewed as a gift to celebrate.

Try these Incentives

Use one of these three ideas to feel good during movement: music, nature, and/or people.

Add some motivating music. According to McGonigal, music is a “powerful evoker of joy” and can help release endorphins and dopamine. Endorphins and dopamine are both chemicals in your body that make you happy, but they function in different ways. Endorphins relieve pain naturally. When they attach to your brain’s reward centers (opiate receptors), dopamine (a mood-boosting neurotransmitter) is then released. For example, endorphins will naturally help soothe a runner’s achy muscles.

 

 

“Green Exercise”, working out in nature has an immediate effect on mood and can help people feel calmer and happier, improving mental health.

 

 

 

 

Moving Together
As Barbara Streisand so eloquently sang, “People, people who need people, are the luckiest people in the world.”   As a former professional dancer, I felt firsthand the power I experienced dancing, moving, and even breathing as one in a group. The sensations and emotions you experience, whether they be strength, joy, or discovery, are amplified tenfold in a group setting.

 

 

I’ll never forget my first time back teaching in-person group classes toward the end of the pandemic. One of the participants came up to me with tears in her eyes after class. She shared how deeply moved she was by being able to exercise in connection with others again, breathing, laughing, and moving together. This revelation both surprised and touched her.

Track Progress In a Novel Way

Give your trackers a break for a bit. Maybe be a little less data-driven; find a word that best describes how you feel after a workout. Track that instead to support a mindset of joy.

During one of my recent Signature BoneSmart Pilates® Standing Strong classes that I teach, I asked the participants to note how they felt before class with just one word. Some of their words included: “discombobulated, vulnerable, stiff, tired, flustered, and exhausted.”

After an hour of moving together with beautiful music and supportive cues, they each shared a word describing how they felt. These descriptions included solid, confident, invigorated, hopeful, and free. The evolution that occurred with each individual is a testament to the transformative power of movement to elicit joy and optimism.

In Conclusion
The process of moving (even over Zoom) with a joyful mindset and perhaps some motivating music can be transformative and set you up to have a fantastic day!

 

Depending on where you live the summer heat may be approaching or is already at its height. Staying active becomes a challenge, especially for people over 50. Exercising in hot weather requires additional precautions to ensure your safety.

My aim is to provide a comprehensive guide for my BoneSmarties over 50, offering tips and strategies for staying fit while minimizing the risk of heat-related illnesses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Stay Hydrated:     Hydration is crucial when exercising in hot weather, as your body loses water through perspiration. Older adults are more susceptible to dehydration due to decreased thirst sensation. To combat this, it’s essential to drink water before, during, and after physical activity. Avoid alcohol and caffeinated beverages, as they can contribute to dehydration. Carry a water bottle with you and sip regularly to maintain proper hydration levels.  Consider infusing your  water with electrolytes or swap out for a sports drink.  Electrolytes help you replenish minerals  lost through sweat. That’s why water alone is not enough if you’re exercising outdoors in the heat.

  2. Time Your Workouts:    When the sun is at its peak, typically between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., the heat is most intense. It’s advisable to plan your workouts during the cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or late evening. This reduces exposure to extreme heat and minimizes the risk of heat exhaustion or heatstroke.
  3. Dress Appropriately:    Wearing the right clothing can make a significant difference in staying cool during exercise. Opt for lightweight, breathable fabrics that allow air circulation and aid in moisture-wicking. Loose-fitting clothing in light colors reflects sunlight and helps in maintaining a comfortable body temperature. Additionally, wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses protects against the sun’s harmful rays and reduces heat-related discomfort.
  4. Protect Your Skin:   Exercising outdoors increases exposure to harmful UV radiation. Individuals over 50 are particularly vulnerable to sunburn and skin damage. Choose a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher with broad spectrum protection against UVA and UVB. Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or more frequently if sweating excessively. Seeking shade when possible or exercising under tree cover can provide additional protection from direct sunlight.

    You should always wear sunscreen when you go outside, but you should be even more diligent about it if you plan on being out during peak hours.

     

  5. Check the thermostat and your ceiling fans:  Most gyms/health clubs set their thermostats so the air conditioner runs often and keeps the humidity (and sweat) out of the air!    If you have your home A/C set to an economical setting, and you’re doing a high intensity class like HIIT – you may want to make sure your ceiling fans are on and lower your AC for the time it takes you to do a class.

Amy SmileyAmy Smiley, Age 62

TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOU

I spent most of my life in California, with a short stint in Sweden in the 1970s. My degrees are in Chemical Engineering and I worked in the biotech industry once I got out of graduate school. I loved working in such a new field at the time. As the family grew, I decided to quit my paid job and stay home with the children. As time went on I realized I needed a creative outlet and took up Plein air painting (with the same fantastic friend who introduced me to Teresa’s classes!). After my family and friends, I love the outdoors, science, gardening, and art.

WHEN DID YOU BEGIN SESSIONS WITH TERESA?

I started classes with Teresa in 2012 and have continued with them ever since. Teresa’s Pilates classes are a priority for me because of the physical and mental benefits they provide. I have celiac disease, which causes any number of inflammatory problems and Teresa’s classes are essential to my ability to manage those issues. When something has to fall off my plate it won’t be Teresa’s class!

 

WHAT MOVEMENT OR PRINCIPLE HAS HELPED YOU THE MOST?

I’d like to choose just one movement or body dynamic principle that I learned from Teresa that has helped me but there are too many!  From ribs down to soup bowl to lifting your toes…I am always learning something new, even ten years later.  I think, for myself, as I continue to become more body aware, I continue to learn in each class.  And, as new issues develop as the years march on, I discover new fixes for them.  Everything that I have learned from Teresa applies not only in class but in other activities and my daily movement.  Not to mention that Teresa is so gracious with her time whenever anyone has a question about alignment or movement difficulties.  She always takes time to answer any questions and I learn from my questions and those of others.  What a fantastic tool!

 

Amy Smiley Testimonial for Aging Strong Pilates

WHAT WERE THE EFFECTS OF THE PANDEMIC ON YOUR MOVEMENT PRACTICE?

At the beginning of the pandemic, I dropped the gym and in-person classes.  Although we stayed active, I really missed the benefit and connection of group exercise classes.  I worried about how well I would maintain mobility and strength without the motivation and guidance that Teresa provides.  When Teresa opened her remote classes I jumped right in and was so grateful! Now that some degree of normalcy is returning, having the option of in-person and virtual classes is even better than before.

I absolutely love the energy and camaraderie in the in-person classes.  They are a tonic for the soul.  I can’t think of a single class where I haven’t had a good laugh for one reason or another.  I missed that tremendously until in-person became available again.  But it’s also great to have access to the class online if I can’t make it in person and to have the videos afterward.

 

Picture of Teresa's hybrid Pilates classIn Pilates, you’ll often gain optimal results from an exercise when you make your movements smaller rather than larger.  You’ll also gain more when you focus on the principles of Pilates: Concentration, Control, Centering, Breath, Precision, and Flow. It’s this attention to detail that makes Pilates a Mind-Body Practice.

As with most things in life, “less is more.”  We live in a world where we drink from coffee cups large enough to fill our gas tanks, we eat muffins capable of feeding a family of four, fast food orders are supersized, and Costco supplies us with enough peanut butter to last for years.

Bigger is not always better.

According to Cedric Bryant, chief science officer of the American Council on Exercise, “Thanks in part to the pandemic, many people’s exercise priorities have shifted from intense, calorie-burning workouts to activities that also foster a mind-body connection.”

Is Pilates as Good as Everyone Says?

The strength and flexibility workout is having a moment.

What can — and can’t — it do for us?     Enjoy this recent illuminating NYTimes article.

It’s easy to assume that someone frail won’t have the strength to lift weights. I ask you to remember that adage, “If you don’t use it, you lose it.”  This is true of your muscles and bones. Contrary to what you might think, lifting weights for weak bones is a good thing!

yes you should lift weights if you have osteoporosis

What are the Key Points?

It’s all about proper dosage (weight amount and reps) as well as proper alignment and breathing. Everyone, no matter your age, can benefit significantly from resistance training.

  • Research references strengthening your back muscles (spine extensors) to strengthen bone and prevent spinal fractures. (1)
  • Research also points to the effectiveness of squats for building hip bone mineral density. The key is to emphasize rapid initiation of the concentric portion of the squat.(1) This will build power.
  • This concept can be generalized to most strength training moves (think biceps strengthening-quick on the concentric (bending) portion and slow on the eccentric (lengthening) portion.

On a side note, I recommend wearing foot coverings when lifting weights (like tennis shoes). This will protect your feet should a weight slip out of your hands.

 

lifting weights safely with osteoporosisWhat are the Benefits of Weight Training?

Weight training, more than any other exercise, can help strengthen your muscles and bones, maintain and improve posture, hone your balance, reduce pain, and prevent osteoporosis-related falls and fractures.

And as you become stronger, you’ll notice the aches and pains associated with osteoporosis and osteoarthritis often begin to subside. My clients and patients often report that they feel considerably better and stronger over time, once they’ve added a few weights into their daily routine.

 

 

 

Why does Lifting Weights Work?

Bone mass decreases as we age, so lifting weights can help strengthen the bones and restore lost mass or help minimize loss. (2)  When the tendons of muscles pull on their attached bone, it stimulates bone to grow. You actually want your bones to weigh more because heavier bones are less subject to the brittleness and fractures associated with osteoporosis.

The other benefit with weight training is that the stronger your leg and hip muscles are, the more stable and steady you’ll be. If you do happen to trip, you might catch yourself with your hands.  Strong arm and core muscles can help decelerate your fall, mitigating injury to your knees or hips.

Those with osteoporosis should focus on exercises to strengthen the back, hips and wrists since, according to the Mayo Clinic, these are the areas most damaged by bone loss and at greatest risk for fracture.

 

How often should you weight train?

Resistance training should be done optimally two or three times per week. Each session should include exercises to strengthen the hips and legs, trunk and arm muscles, and each exercise should be performed at least eight to 10 times.

 

I teach a twice-weekly strength training class called “Superpowers”. It’s a 30-minute time-efficient strength training class using 2 sets of hand weights, one light and one heavier set based on your current fitness level. All levels are welcome and movements are carefully designed to be spine safe, bone safe and bone-building!

 

Join me every Monday at 9 am and Friday at 11:30 am Pacific Time on Zoom for Superpowers and level up your muscle and bone health.

Register here: https://bonesmartpilates.as.me/Superpowers

 

References

  1. Sinaki et al. Stronger Back Muscles Reduce Vertebral Fractures, Bone Vol. 30, No. 6 June 2002:836–841
  2. Mosti MP, Kaehler N, Stunes AK, Hoff J, Syversen U. Maximal strength training in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia. J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Oct;27(10):2879-86. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318280d4e2. PMID: 23287836.
  3. Zamoscinska M, Faber IR, Büsch D. Do Older Adults With Reduced Bone Mineral Density Benefit From Strength Training? A Critically Appraised Topic. J Sport Rehabil. 2019 Dec 12;29(6):833-840. doi: 10.1123/jsr.2019-0170. PMID: 31835241.

Do you find your butt slowly disappearing or migrating south? Are your jeans sliding off your butt?

Age-related muscle loss, known as sarcopenia, is a real thing. The good news is you can do targeted workouts to minimize the loss that people experience from increasing age and all the excessive sitting that’s been happening recently.

It’s not too late to literally perk things up.

Round perky butts play a role in aesthetics but there’s even more that’s important!

Having strong gluteal muscles gives you the power to stand up, sit down, squat, and perform all your life activities with power and grace.

Strong glutes are important for proper pelvic alignment, propulsion during walking and running, and single-leg balance support.  They also help to support the lower back during lifting motions.

 

6 Benefits of taking the Active Aging Bootie Barre class

Strong glutes help your posture and lessen back and neck pain.

Increased sitting can result in slumped posture and “dead butt syndrome”. This is when your butt muscles become inhibited and literally forget how to fire.

How does this happen?  It’s actually a common problem today.  People are spending inordinate amounts of time sitting behind their computers, zooming, etc.  Picture it, your butt is tucked under, your back is in a C curve (I call it cashew posture) and your head is shifted forward in front of your shoulders. Feeling the back and neck pain yet? With all this faulty sitting, the muscles in the front of your hip joints become short and tight and the opposite muscles, the butt muscles, become neurologically inhibited, overstretched, weak, and inactive.  Strengthening the butt muscles, back muscles and stretching the muscles in front of the hip, exercises that are included in the active aging bootie barre class, address these common issues.

 

Strong Glutes help Prevent Injuries.

Building strong gluteal muscles (the focus of “bootie barre”) can help you avoid injury as well as recover from injury to your low back, hips, knees, and ankles by creating better alignment and stability.  As an example, when squatting sometimes people will cave one knee in towards midline instead of tracking the knee over the foot. That’s often a result of weak gluteal muscles on that side. This is a common dysfunctional pattern known as “dynamic valgus” and it can be prevented with strong gluteal and hip muscles. Proper hip, knee, foot alignment is cued regularly during our bootie barre class.

Strong Glutes Improve Balance

Who remembers those old commercials “Help I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!”  Though people joked about it, those commercials depicted a real and serious situation.  Maybe it’s not an issue for you currently but having strong glutes now means you’ll have a strong foundation to propel yourself when walking, have the stability in your pelvis to balance on one leg, get in and out of your vehicle, or shower with ease and if you fall, “you Will be able to get up”!  This all translates to better long-term quality of life.

 

Strong Glutes Enhance Bone Density in the Hips and Pelvis

Strength training is the best way to improve localized bone density. This happens when muscle tissue tugs on your bones during strength training. By building up the muscles around your pelvis (your glutes) as we do in class, you are improving your muscle and bone strength as well as the stability of your entire pelvis and hips.

 

 

Strong Gluts are Aesthetically Appealing

Though not the most important reason, this is often the primary reason people start working on their glutes. It’s a valid goal to have to keep our pants from sliding down and if chasing a perky butt is your goal, I say go for it!

This class is targeted for you, in the last and best third of your life, to get strong safely and efficiently.

As a physical therapist, I ensure that you’re not using your low back to lift your leg behind you (a common error).  I design exercises that work all ranges of motion of the hip and stimulate both slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibers found in your glutes.  And, we get it all done in just 30 time-efficient minutes!  Allow me to be your guide to lift your tush and safely challenge your limits.

Sign up for the Active Aging Bootie Barre Class every Wednesday at 11:30 PM PST. Can’t make that time? Not a problem. You can purchase the class and I can send you a recording to do at your convenience!

Click here for a preview of some Active Aging Bootie Barre Moves!

 

 

 

Written by Teresa Maldonado Marchok, MPT

Physical Therapist,  Pilates Teacher, Aging Strong Activist, Educator, and lifelong learner.   www.BoneSmartPilates.com

 

 

References

BoneSmart Pilates Youtube channel Gluteal Amnesia aka Dead Butt Syndrome  https://youtu.be/YevqgbmS4K8

Buckthorpe M, Stride M, Villa FD. ASSESSING AND TREATING GLUTEUS MAXIMUS WEAKNESS — A CLINICAL COMMENTARYInt J Sports Phys Ther. 2019;14(4):655–669.

Dunsky A. The Effect of Balance and Coordination Exercises on Quality of Life in Older Adults: A Mini-Review. Front Aging Neurosci. 2019;11:318. Published 2019 Nov 15. doi:10.3389/fnagi.2019.00318

This workshop is for you if you’ve been diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis or if you have healthy bones and want to keep them that way! In this 90 minute session you will discover how to move safely with bone loss.   You’ll learn to find your ideal posture, how to lift safely, what exercises help with hip and spine bone strength, and how to avoid fractures.

I’ll share my easy to remember BoneSmart ABC’s for bone health, which will be the foundation for you to live a  bone healthy life.

Bonus:

Along with the workshop, you’ll get free access to my Private Forum on the BoneSmart Pilates website.  You can ask any exercise-related questions that you have on the forum. Your password will be emailed to you when you register.

This workshop is presented by Teresa Maldonado Marchok, licensed PT, nationally certified Pilates teacher, former professional dancer, ambassador for the national organization American Bone Health and creator of the award winning DVD series BoneSmart Pilates®

This workshop is a great balance of research and information, along with exercise and practice. I highly recommend this workshop if you are 50+ whether you have osteoporosis or not. Brilliant!

– Linda A.

Purchase the workshop here!

With over 80 active participants from several countries this virtual event was a resounding success!  Thanks to your support, we collectively raised $1,625 to benefit the national organization American Bone Health, a nonprofit that I’ve volunteered with for the last 8 years to increase community bone health awareness and fracture prevention.

It is with gratitude that I express to you my thanks for showing up, being engaged, and asking thought-provoking questions!

Two questions from the chat that I wanted to answer here are:

1) Is walking considered a bone-building exercise?
2) Should I use a weighted vest?

1)  Walking is not considered bone-building exercise but it is great for your heart if you keep up a good pace.   It’s also good for osteoporosis in terms of bone maintenance, helping to prevent further bone loss. So keep walking and if you can add hills and vary speed-even better. Keep in mind that we experience about 0.5-1.0% of bone loss yearly. The rate of loss due to menopause can jump to a 2-5% loss those 5-6 years post-menopause due to the dramatic drop in estrogen.  If your T score remains the same over time that’s a good thing, you’re preventing loss as what you’re doing is offsetting the natural 0.5-1% yearly loss.

(Palombaro KM. “Effects of walking-only interventions on bone mineral density at various skeletal sites: a meta-analysis.” J Geriatr Phys Ther. 2005;28(3):102-7.)

 

2) A lot of people with osteoporosis ask about using weighted vests. Some designs are not suitable for those with osteoporosis including ones where the vest sits on the shoulders with the majority of weight in the upper trunk. This can put undue downward pressure on the spine promoting hyperkyphosis (an exaggerated rounding of the upper back) that puts the spine at risk of increased fracture.  Weighted vests should not be used by those with hyperkyphosis or spine fractures.If you are cleared by your healthcare practitioner to use a vest, make sure the vest has a snug fit, is weighted throughout the trunk with the majority of weight close to your hips. Start with a small amount of weight and make sure to use the spine sparing hip hinging technique we practiced in my Osteoporosis Do’s and Don’ts Workshop to avoid rounding your spine.Weighted vests with lunges, squats, step-ups, side lunges and small jumps 3x per week build bone in the hip according to Christine Snow’s bone research lab at Oregon State University.

 

(Long-term Exercise Using Weighted Vests Prevents Hip Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women by Christine M. Snow, Janet M. Shaw, Kerri M. Winters, and Kara A. Witzke Journal of Gerontology: 2000, Vol. 55A, No. 9, M489-M491)

While there are no definitive studies on how much weight a vest should have, experts recommend anywhere from five to ten percent of a person’s body weight. This recommendation is based on studies on maximum weight allowances for backpacks. Too much weight can result in injury.

Back extension exercises are great for the spine.   

Remember that back extension exercises (lying on your belly lifting your chest and head slightly, improve the strength of the muscles in your spine and don’t carry the risks of a weighted vest. The pull of the muscles on the bone stimulates bone growth. A study by Dr. Sinaki from the Mayo clinic showed fewer fractures even 10 years after the study in the group that did back extension exercises vs the control group.

 

(Sinaki, M, et al. 2002. “Stronger back muscles reduce the incidence of vertebral fractures: A prospective 10-year follow-up of postmenopausal women.” Bone, 30 (6), 836-41.)

 

(Sinaki, M., et al. 1996. “Can strong back extensors prevent vertebral fractures in women with osteoporosis?” Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 71 (10), 951-56.)

 

To keep us connected and moving, Teresa is currently offering Quarantine Remote BoneSmart Pilates classes, 55 min long, all classes bone safe/spine safe.

Registration links for the classes will be sent when BoneSmart Pilates receives payment. If you have any questions, please contact Teresa at teresa@bonesmartpilates.com

Participating in these classes will require that you create an account with zoom, it is free at https://zoom.us.  When you pay, please include a note in Paypal or by emailing me, indicating which class/classes you wish to register for. Be specific noting the DATE and time of your desired class.

Schedule is subject to change.  Classes will run through the end of April and we’ll re-evaluate then.

Payment Information:

$20 per class and must be paid in advance in order to receive the registration link. After doing that you’ll receive another email with the actual link to the class so don’t delay the registration step.

**If you’re experiencing financial hardship and just can’t swing it right now, I still want to support you. As a licensed physical therapist and movement educator, I’ve been blessed with a gift that I want to share so please just donate what you can, no questions asked.

Options to pay:
www.paypal.me/BoneSmartPilates/   Preferred method (this requires a PayPal account)
Enter the amount appropriate for the number of classes that you are registering for. For example, if it is just one class, fill in $20.  If it is 3 classes, enter $60 and so on (or enter your donation amount)
Note: You must include a note when you purchase in PayPal (or email me separately), indicating which class dates and times you’re requesting. Be specific

Venmo.com  @Teresa-Marchok (also you must include a note with the specific class, date and time you’re signing up for.  Include your email address with your venmo note so I can send you the registration link.